The research project intends to contribute actively to the cooperation between Europe and China through the investigating of opportunities for mutual integration in the healthcare sector. Cooperation and potential synergies will be examined from a comprehensive perspective, including policies at national and local level, the legal environment, medical practices, healthcare industries and related businesses. In order to develop a comprehensive understanding of the integration opportunities, an interdisciplinary approach is followed. The tools and technical knowledge derived from the medical, legal, economics and humanities fields are used. The premises While facing different stages of economic development, China and Europe share some key demographic trends. Europe has developed good examples of universal healthcare systems, but significant and dramatic changes that have taken place over the past two decades have led to a decrease in health expenditure and a decline in public assistance (Hope report, 2011). In particular, the Mediterranean welfare state model (Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece), is characterized by a welfare state (Jelena Batić, 2011) involved in economic crisis. Starting from this position, the main challenges faced by European countries are to improve public services, especially to a growing geriatric population, while concurrently decreasing healthcare spending. Europe has vast experience in developing and operating universal healthcare systems. These systems manage policies and comprehensive solutions that range from prevention to long-term care assistance. European industries have reached a scale of efficiency, global competitiveness and sophisticated approaches to innovation in the pharmaceutical, equipment and para-pharmaceutical sectors. On the other hand, China has embraced large reforms in the healthcare system to upgrade the quality and coverage of assistance provided to the Chinese people. Within this process, the universal healthcare system has been chosen as benchmark. Multiple strategies have been promoted on both the supply and demand sides. Similar to Europe, China is experiencing the challenges associated with an increasing aging population. The geriatric population requires appropriate, specific and long-term health care assistance, which costs significantly more than those services consumed by a comparatively younger population (Deloitte, 2010). As a result of both internal and external factors, expenditure on healthcare in China is expected to increase from 4.7% of GDP to 6%-7% in the next few years. Per capita expenditure should be set at a level of $437 in 2016, compared to $109.5 in 2007, while pharmaceutical sales should keep growing at double digit rates in the medium term (Deloitte, 2011). A Europe-China partnership would be a win-win strategy. Potentially, Europe and China have complementarities that could help each other face their specific needs in the long run. In this scenario, China would benefit from gaining knowledge and expertise from European countries at different levels. From how to project and run a universal system; how to plan a specific care program for its ageing population; to the use of western medicine to cope with new and improved medical needs of the population. Europe could “export” to China solutions, best practices and thus find business opportunities. At the same time, China could export to Europe practices and approaches of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) that could be cost saving and effective in specific pathologies. The research focus In this scenario, the researchers in the social science and humanities area will compare the European and Chinese healthcare systems at different levels, including value systems and ethical issues. The economic expert will specifically analyse the integration reached between China and Europe in the healthcare related industries (technologies, pharmaceutical, and other). Foreign direct investments and trade flow trends will be examined, at regional and provincial levels. The typical cost-benefit tools will be used to evaluate the economic impact of integrating Western Medicine (WM) and TCM practices, supporting the medical team of experts. The legal instruments will define obstacles and plausible solutions that can be generated by the regulatory environment, as well as appropriate solutions to enhance collaboration both at institutional, medical practices and business levels. The team of experts in the medical field will investigate best practices of traditional medical systems using a modern science framework. The team will develop a process of recognition and scientific validation of TCM versus Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) at different levels as recommended by the World Health Organization Traditional medicine Strategy 2003-2005. This strategy includes the following indicators: 1. policy, i.e. integrate TM/CAM with national health care systems, as appropriate, by developing and implementing national TM/CAM policies and programs; 2. safety, efficacy and quality, i.e. promote the safety, efficacy and quality of TM/CAM by expanding the knowledgebase on TM/CAM, and by providing guidance on regulatory and quality assurance standards; 3. access, i.e. increase the availability and affordability of TM/CAM, as appropriate, with an emphasis on access for poor populations; 4. rational use, i.e. promote therapeutically sound use of appropriate TM/CAM by providers and consumers.

China and Europe taking care of healthcare solutions - “CHETCH”

CALZOLAIO, Ermanno
2013-01-01

Abstract

The research project intends to contribute actively to the cooperation between Europe and China through the investigating of opportunities for mutual integration in the healthcare sector. Cooperation and potential synergies will be examined from a comprehensive perspective, including policies at national and local level, the legal environment, medical practices, healthcare industries and related businesses. In order to develop a comprehensive understanding of the integration opportunities, an interdisciplinary approach is followed. The tools and technical knowledge derived from the medical, legal, economics and humanities fields are used. The premises While facing different stages of economic development, China and Europe share some key demographic trends. Europe has developed good examples of universal healthcare systems, but significant and dramatic changes that have taken place over the past two decades have led to a decrease in health expenditure and a decline in public assistance (Hope report, 2011). In particular, the Mediterranean welfare state model (Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece), is characterized by a welfare state (Jelena Batić, 2011) involved in economic crisis. Starting from this position, the main challenges faced by European countries are to improve public services, especially to a growing geriatric population, while concurrently decreasing healthcare spending. Europe has vast experience in developing and operating universal healthcare systems. These systems manage policies and comprehensive solutions that range from prevention to long-term care assistance. European industries have reached a scale of efficiency, global competitiveness and sophisticated approaches to innovation in the pharmaceutical, equipment and para-pharmaceutical sectors. On the other hand, China has embraced large reforms in the healthcare system to upgrade the quality and coverage of assistance provided to the Chinese people. Within this process, the universal healthcare system has been chosen as benchmark. Multiple strategies have been promoted on both the supply and demand sides. Similar to Europe, China is experiencing the challenges associated with an increasing aging population. The geriatric population requires appropriate, specific and long-term health care assistance, which costs significantly more than those services consumed by a comparatively younger population (Deloitte, 2010). As a result of both internal and external factors, expenditure on healthcare in China is expected to increase from 4.7% of GDP to 6%-7% in the next few years. Per capita expenditure should be set at a level of $437 in 2016, compared to $109.5 in 2007, while pharmaceutical sales should keep growing at double digit rates in the medium term (Deloitte, 2011). A Europe-China partnership would be a win-win strategy. Potentially, Europe and China have complementarities that could help each other face their specific needs in the long run. In this scenario, China would benefit from gaining knowledge and expertise from European countries at different levels. From how to project and run a universal system; how to plan a specific care program for its ageing population; to the use of western medicine to cope with new and improved medical needs of the population. Europe could “export” to China solutions, best practices and thus find business opportunities. At the same time, China could export to Europe practices and approaches of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) that could be cost saving and effective in specific pathologies. The research focus In this scenario, the researchers in the social science and humanities area will compare the European and Chinese healthcare systems at different levels, including value systems and ethical issues. The economic expert will specifically analyse the integration reached between China and Europe in the healthcare related industries (technologies, pharmaceutical, and other). Foreign direct investments and trade flow trends will be examined, at regional and provincial levels. The typical cost-benefit tools will be used to evaluate the economic impact of integrating Western Medicine (WM) and TCM practices, supporting the medical team of experts. The legal instruments will define obstacles and plausible solutions that can be generated by the regulatory environment, as well as appropriate solutions to enhance collaboration both at institutional, medical practices and business levels. The team of experts in the medical field will investigate best practices of traditional medical systems using a modern science framework. The team will develop a process of recognition and scientific validation of TCM versus Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) at different levels as recommended by the World Health Organization Traditional medicine Strategy 2003-2005. This strategy includes the following indicators: 1. policy, i.e. integrate TM/CAM with national health care systems, as appropriate, by developing and implementing national TM/CAM policies and programs; 2. safety, efficacy and quality, i.e. promote the safety, efficacy and quality of TM/CAM by expanding the knowledgebase on TM/CAM, and by providing guidance on regulatory and quality assurance standards; 3. access, i.e. increase the availability and affordability of TM/CAM, as appropriate, with an emphasis on access for poor populations; 4. rational use, i.e. promote therapeutically sound use of appropriate TM/CAM by providers and consumers.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11393/182016
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